Horseshoe Creek Station
Metadata
Title:Horseshoe Creek Station
Other Names:Old Bellwood Stage Station, Bellwood Stage Station, Horseshoe Station, Horseshoe Stage Station, Horseshoe Pony Express Station, Horse Shoe
History:Old Horseshoe Station 1861-1868. Frontier overland stage, Pony Express and Overland Telegraph Station. Site marked by a white post. On route of the old Oregon, Mormon and California Trails. In pioneer days a notorious character, Joe Slade, ruled this vicinity with an iron hand. Allegedly, he cut off the ears of an associate to force obedience to his will, carried the pieces in his pocket, and on occasions when fellow employees were to doubt his authority, Slade would bring forth the several aural appendages and finger them nervously. It is said the scheme worked. Slade was later hung by vigilantes in Montana. The station was later destroyed by a three day siege by Indians, which began March 19, 1868. (WPA) Pony Express Station located 15 miles from Cottonwood Station and 10 miles from Elk Horn Station. Home Station and Headquarter station for Superintendent Joseph A. Slade. He was Superintendent for the Bromley's Division that covered all stations from Horseshoe west to Salt Lake City. (Henderson) "Rough and bad road. After 14 miles cross Bitter Cottonwood Creek; water rarely flows; after rain 10 feet wide and 6 inches deep; grass and fuel abundant. Pass Indian shop and store. At Bitter Creek branch of Cotton-wood the road to Salt Lake City forks. Emigrants follow the Upper or South road over spurs of the Black Hills, some way south of the river, to avoid kanyons and to find grass. The station is called Horseshoe Creek. Residence of road-agent, Mr. Slade, and one of the worst places on the line." (Burton) This is the site of the Old Bellwood Stage Station, burned by Indians in 1857; later it was a stage and Pony Express station. The surrounding field was an early emigrant campground. (Wyoming Recreation Commission, 1984)
County:Platte
Feature Category:Manmade Features
Origin Of Name:Located near Horseshoe Creek. (WSL)Old Horseshoe Station 1861-1868. Frontier overland stage, Pony Express and Overland Telegraph Station. Site marked by a white post. On route of the old Oregon, Mormon and California Trails. In pioneer days a notorious character, Joe Slade, ruled this vicinity with an iron hand. Allegedly, he cut off the ears of an associate to force obedience to his will, carried the pieces in his pocket, and on occasions when fellow employees were to doubt his authority, Slade would bring forth the several aural appendages and finger them nervously. It is said the scheme worked. Slade was later hung by vigilantes in Montana. The station was later destroyed by a three day siege by Indians, which began March 19, 1868. (WPA) Pony Express Station located 15 miles from Cottonwood Station and 10 miles from Elk Horn Station. Home Station and Headquarter station for Superintendent Joseph A. Slade. He was Superintendent for the Bromley's Division that covered all stations from Horseshoe west to Salt Lake City. (Henderson) "Rough and bad road. After 14 miles cross Bitter Cottonwood Creek; water rarely flows; after rain 10 feet wide and 6 inches deep; grass and fuel abundant. Pass Indian shop and store. At Bitter Creek branch of Cotton-wood the road to Salt Lake City forks. Emigrants follow the Upper or South road over spurs of the Black Hills, some way south of the river, to avoid kanyons and to find grass. The station is called Horseshoe Creek. Residence of road-agent, Mr. Slade, and one of the worst places on the line." (Burton) This is the site of the Old Bellwood Stage Station, burned by Indians in 1857; later it was a stage and Pony Express station. The surrounding field was an early emigrant campground. (Wyoming Recreation Commission, 1984)
Type (DCMI):JPEG
Link:Search Wyoming Places
Document ID:11183610

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