Deer Creek Station
Metadata
Title:Deer Creek Station
Other Names:Mercedes, Nuttall, Glenrock
History:Deer Creek Station was a trading post consisting of a store, post office and blacksmith shop. It was established in 1857 by Joseph Bissonette in connection with the Indian Agency. The agent was a Major Twiss; he was removed from office by President LIncoln in 1861. Bissonette left in the fall of 1865, having lost his stock to the Sioux, and went to Fort Laramie. This was also a stage and Pony Express station; it was burned by the Indians in 1866. William Henry Jackson establishes the date of burning as August 18, 1866. There was an emigrant campground here earlier in the history of the area. Fremont (1842) mentions good grass and water here. Various emigrants to 1852 mention camping at this point. (Wyoming Recreation Commission, 1984) "Located just east of present Glenrock, Wyoming, Deer Creek Station, on the route of the Oregon Trail, served as a Pony Express Station prior to its designation as a telegraph station in 1861. According to one early telegraph operator, "Deer Creek was one hundred miles west of Fort Laramie, and twenty-eight miles east of where Casper was later situated." (Unrau) "Along the Platte River, now shrunk to 100 yards. After 10 miles, M. Bissonette; at Deer Creek, a post-office, blacksmith's shop, and store near Indian Agency. Thence a waste of wild sage to Little Muddy, a creek with water. No accommodations nor provisions at station." (Burton) The Pony Express Station was located 10 miles from Box Elder Station and 10 miles from Bridger Station on the west bank of Deer Creek. In Pony Express days, the station was owned and operated by an Indian Trader by the name of Bisonette, who was Station Keeper for a while. (Henderson)
County:Converse
Feature Category:Manmade Features
Origin Of Name:Located 10 miles from Box Elder Station and 10 miles from Bridger Station on the west bank of Deer Creek. In Pony Express days, the station was owned and operated by an Indian Trader by the name of Bisonette, who was Station Keeper for a while. (Henderson) "Deer Creek Station was the name applied in the 60's, but as that outpost fell into disuse, a settlement grew up at the mouth of Deer Creek, which was called Mercedes. After the discovery of coal, the place was named Nuttall, from Wm. Nuttall, who found and developed the coal property. In 1887 it took the name of Glenrock (when the buildings were moved to the present location), from the sandstone eminence near the refinery." The name Glenrock means "Rock in the Valley." (Annals of Wyoming 28:2)Deer Creek Station was a trading post consisting of a store, post office and blacksmith shop. It was established in 1857 by Joseph Bissonette in connection with the Indian Agency. The agent was a Major Twisshe was removed from office by President LIncoln in 1861. Bissonette left in the fall of 1865, having lost his stock to the Sioux, and went to Fort Laramie. This was also a stage and Pony Express stationit was burned by the Indians in 1866. William Henry Jackson establishes the date of burning as August 18, 1866. There was an emigrant campground here earlier in the history of the area. Fremont (1842) mentions good grass and water here. Various emigrants to 1852 mention camping at this point. (Wyoming Recreation Commission, 1984) "Located just east of present Glenrock, Wyoming, Deer Creek Station, on the route of the Oregon Trail, served as a Pony Express Station prior to its designation as a telegraph station in 1861. According to one early telegraph operator, "Deer Creek was one hundred miles west of Fort Laramie, and twenty-eight miles east of where Casper was later situated." (Unrau) "Along the Platte River, now shrunk to 100 yards. After 10 miles, M. Bissonetteat Deer Creek, a post-office, blacksmith's shop, and store near Indian Agency. Thence a waste of wild sage to Little Muddy, a creek with water. No accommodations nor provisions at station." (Burton) The Pony Express Station was located 10 miles from Box Elder Station and 10 miles from Bridger Station on the west bank of Deer Creek. In Pony Express days, the station was owned and operated by an Indian Trader by the name of Bisonette, who was Station Keeper for a while. (Henderson)
Type (DCMI):JPEG
Link:Search Wyoming Places
Document ID:11141807

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