Torrington
Metadata
Title:Torrington
History:Torrington Post Office was established on July 20, 1889 with William G. Curtis as its first postmaster. (Wyoming Post Offices) On January 4, 1908, residents of Torrington voted for the incorporation of the town. (Torrington Telegram January 09, 1908, page 1) Small town and station on the Burlington and Missouri Railway in Laramie County. Stock raising the leading industry. Population, 18. (Wyoming State Business Directory, 1901-02) A prosperous and growing town on the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad, 8 miles west of the Nebraska state line, in Laramie County. Leading industries, farming and stockraising. Good churches, schools and business houses. (Wyoming State Business Directory, 1910-11) Torrington, the county seat of Goshen County, is located on the Burlington Railroad and the North Platte River, nine miles west of the Nebraska line and 90 miles northeast of Cheyenne. Its present population is 1,687, and of the vicinity about 3,500. Altitude 3,960 feet. The Union Pacific Railroad is built to within a few miles of this place, and will soon be extended through the Goshen Hole country, thus opening up a vast undeveloped region of splendid country. There is now under irrigation from the Government projects over 125,000 acres of the best irrigated land in America suitable for the raising of alfalfa, sugar beets, potatoes and all kinds of grain. In this vicinity also are over 1,000,000 acres of good dry farming land for all of which Torrington is the trading center. Agriculture is the principal industry and alfalfa, sugar beets, potatoes and all kinds of grain are grown in abundance. Torrington has a municipal electric light plant and water works, also a sewer system. Has an accredited high school, graduates being admitted to the State University of Wyoming and other states. Five religious denominations have organizations, four of which have church buildings. Lodges are well represented, some with large membership. (Wyoming State Business Directory, 1922)
County:Goshen
Feature Category:Manmade Features
Origin Of Name:Named by a Mr. Curtis of Torrington, for the town of Torrington, England. Curtis was one of the early settlers in the area. (WPA) This town received its name from Torrington, Conn., and Torrington, Conn., received its name from Torrington, England. William Curtis came from Torrington, Conn., to Colorado where he worked on the farm of John Coy. These two men traveled horseback down the Laramie River and the North Platte where they decided to homestead. This was in 1883 and they soon applied for a post office in the name of "Torrington" which was granted. (Christiansen)Torrington Post Office was established on July 20, 1889 with William G. Curtis as its first postmaster. (Wyoming Post Offices) On January 4, 1908, residents of Torrington voted for the incorporation of the town. (Torrington Telegram January 09, 1908, page 1) Small town and station on the Burlington and Missouri Railway in Laramie County. Stock raising the leading industry. Population, 18. (Wyoming State Business Directory, 1901-02) A prosperous and growing town on the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad, 8 miles west of the Nebraska state line, in Laramie County. Leading industries, farming and stockraising. Good churches, schools and business houses. (Wyoming State Business Directory, 1910-11) Torrington, the county seat of Goshen County, is located on the Burlington Railroad and the North Platte River, nine miles west of the Nebraska line and 90 miles northeast of Cheyenne. Its present population is 1,687, and of the vicinity about 3,500. Altitude 3,960 feet. The Union Pacific Railroad is built to within a few miles of this place, and will soon be extended through the Goshen Hole country, thus opening up a vast undeveloped region of splendid country. There is now under irrigation from the Government projects over 125,000 acres of the best irrigated land in America suitable for the raising of alfalfa, sugar beets, potatoes and all kinds of grain. In this vicinity also are over 1,000,000 acres of good dry farming land for all of which Torrington is the trading center. Agriculture is the principal industry and alfalfa, sugar beets, potatoes and all kinds of grain are grown in abundance. Torrington has a municipal electric light plant and water works, also a sewer system. Has an accredited high school, graduates being admitted to the State University of Wyoming and other states. Five religious denominations have organizations, four of which have church buildings. Lodges are well represented, some with large membership. (Wyoming State Business Directory, 1922)
Type (DCMI):JPEG
Link:Search Wyoming Places
Document ID:11141656

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