Newcastle
Metadata
Title:Newcastle
History:Newcastle Post Office was established as New Castle Post Office on October 12, 1889 in Crook County prior to the formation of Weston County, 1890. Levi R. Davis was the first postmaster. Its name was changed to Newcastle on February 7, 1890. (Wyoming Post Offices) County seat of Weston County. An important coal mining town in the eastern part of Weston County on the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railway; 1,800 tons of coal are mined and shipped daily from this point, giving employment to a large force of men. The principal industry of the surrounding country is stockraising, and Newcastle is the shipping point. Electric light, water works, good business blocks and neat homes make Newcastle a desirable place for residence. (Wyoming State Business Directory, 1910-11) County seat of Weston County, 5 miles west of the South Dakota State line and 178 miles southeast of Sheridan, on the Burlington route. Adjacent and tributary to Newcastle are the famous Osage Oil Fields, Wyoming's most promising field. Also tributary to this city are the Mule Creek, Upton, Thornton and Beaver Valley oil fields. Mineral resources aside from oil are countless. Coal can be found within a stone's throw of the city. The famous Cambria mines are at the very door and 700 tons of coal are mined there daily and shipped from Newcastle. Cement, limestone, gypsum, clays are found here in abundance and only await development. Newcastle owns its own water and electric light systems. Live stock and farming are large industries there being now over 20,000 head of cattle and 100,000 head of sheep in the vicinity. Population of city and immediate vicinity 1,800. Altitude 4,300 feet. (Wyoming State Business Directory, 1922)
County:Weston
Feature Category:Manmade Features
Origin Of Name:Named for "Newcastle on the tyne," great coal port and industrial city of England, by Mr. Hemingway, who was first superintendent of Cambria Coal Mine. (WPA) Newcastle ... named for the great English coal port, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, proudly calls itself the "Western Gateway to the Black Hills." (Wyoming Guide)Newcastle Post Office was established as New Castle Post Office on October 12, 1889 in Crook County prior to the formation of Weston County, 1890. Levi R. Davis was the first postmaster. Its name was changed to Newcastle on February 7, 1890. (Wyoming Post Offices) County seat of Weston County. An important coal mining town in the eastern part of Weston County on the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railway; 1,800 tons of coal are mined and shipped daily from this point, giving employment to a large force of men. The principal industry of the surrounding country is stockraising, and Newcastle is the shipping point. Electric light, water works, good business blocks and neat homes make Newcastle a desirable place for residence. (Wyoming State Business Directory, 1910-11) County seat of Weston County, 5 miles west of the South Dakota State line and 178 miles southeast of Sheridan, on the Burlington route. Adjacent and tributary to Newcastle are the famous Osage Oil Fields, Wyoming's most promising field. Also tributary to this city are the Mule Creek, Upton, Thornton and Beaver Valley oil fields. Mineral resources aside from oil are countless. Coal can be found within a stone's throw of the city. The famous Cambria mines are at the very door and 700 tons of coal are mined there daily and shipped from Newcastle. Cement, limestone, gypsum, clays are found here in abundance and only await development. Newcastle owns its own water and electric light systems. Live stock and farming are large industries there being now over 20,000 head of cattle and 100,000 head of sheep in the vicinity. Population of city and immediate vicinity 1,800. Altitude 4,300 feet. (Wyoming State Business Directory, 1922)
Type (DCMI):JPEG
Topic:Jubilee memories. Brown, Mabel E. Newcastle, Wyo. : Newcastle News-letter Journal, 1965.; Nicole Lebsack. Newcastle, Wyoming. WyoHistory.org
Link:Search Wyoming Places
Document ID:11141212

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