Yellowstone National Park
Metadata
Title:Yellowstone National Park
Other Names:Wonderland, Yellowstone Park
History:In the northwest corner of Wyoming, in the heart of the Rocky Mountains, is located Yellowstone National Park, Yellowstone Park Post Office. Its boundaries overlap a few miles into Montana on the north and Idaho and Montana on the west. The reservation is about 65 miles east and west and 75 miles north and south. ... Yellowstone National Park is reached by stage from Cody, on the Burlington and Missouri Railway, from Opal on the Union Pacific, from Livingston, Montana, on the Northern Pacific. The transportation companies given all have their principal office at Cinnabar, Montana. (Wyoming State Business Directory, 1910-11) Tourist travel of the park did not start until the late 1870's after the railroad was established. Away from the railroad was a real adventure attended not only with strenuous hardships, but dangers from man and beast. Except among hunters and trappers the rugged mountain region of Northwest Wyoming had remained almost a terra incognita. The Reynolds Expedition sent out by the United States government attempted to enter the Yellowstone National Park region in the spring of 1860 but was blocked by heavy snow. Four years later Captain W. DeLacy, in command of an unsuccessful prospecting expedition, discovered Lewis and Shoshone Lakes and the Lower Geyser Basin. In 1869 the Folsom-Cook-Peterson Expedition traversed the region. It was, however, through the efforts of the Washburn-Langford-Doane Expedition, which spent several weeks in 1870, exploring the Yellowstone country, that the area was later set aside as a park. In 1871, the Hayden Survey party entered the region to make official explorations and surveys and continued the work in 1872, completing it in 1878. On March 1, 1872, President Grant signed the act which set aside Yellowstone Park "for benefit and enjoyment of the people," thereby the first national park as such in the world. (WPA)
County:Park; Teton
Feature Category:Special Features; Yellowstone National Park
Origin Of Name:National Park lying mostly in Wyoming, but includes a small part of Montana, and is about 65 miles long and 55 miles wide. ... Named from the river. (Gannett,1905) The Origin of the Name "Yellowstone" When French-Canadian trappers traveled through what is today eastern Montana, they asked the Minnetaree tribe the name of the big river. The Minnetaree responded "Mi tse a-da-zi," which translates as "Rock Yellow River." (Historians do not know why the Minnetaree gave this name to the river.) The trappers translated this into French "Roche Jaune" or "Pierre Jaune." In 1797, explorer-geographer David Thomson used the English version "Yellow Stone." Lewis and Clark called the Yellowstone River by the French and English forms. Although the English name originally was separated into two parts, subsequent usage formalized the name as a single word ”Yellowstone." Yellowstone National Park was thus named after the Yellowstone River, which has its headwaters on Younts Peak, southeast of the park. The river flows north into the park, forms Yellowstone Lake, and continues its 671-mile journey to join the Missouri River at the Montana-North Dakota border. The Yellowstone River remains the longest river in the United States without a major dam blocking its flow. (Yellowstone A Brief History)In the northwest corner of Wyoming, in the heart of the Rocky Mountains, is located Yellowstone National Park, Yellowstone Park Post Office. Its boundaries overlap a few miles into Montana on the north and Idaho and Montana on the west. The reservation is about 65 miles east and west and 75 miles north and south. ... Yellowstone National Park is reached by stage from Cody, on the Burlington and Missouri Railway, from Opal on the Union Pacific, from Livingston, Montana, on the Northern Pacific. The transportation companies given all have their principal office at Cinnabar, Montana. (Wyoming State Business Directory, 1910-11) Tourist travel of the park did not start until the late 1870's after the railroad was established. Away from the railroad was a real adventure attended not only with strenuous hardships, but dangers from man and beast. Except among hunters and trappers the rugged mountain region of Northwest Wyoming had remained almost a terra incognita. The Reynolds Expedition sent out by the United States government attempted to enter the Yellowstone National Park region in the spring of 1860 but was blocked by heavy snow. Four years later Captain W. DeLacy, in command of an unsuccessful prospecting expedition, discovered Lewis and Shoshone Lakes and the Lower Geyser Basin. In 1869 the Folsom-Cook-Peterson Expedition traversed the region. It was, however, through the efforts of the Washburn-Langford-Doane Expedition, which spent several weeks in 1870, exploring the Yellowstone country, that the area was later set aside as a park. In 1871, the Hayden Survey party entered the region to make official explorations and surveys and continued the work in 1872, completing it in 1878. On March 1, 1872, President Grant signed the act which set aside Yellowstone Park "for benefit and enjoyment of the people," thereby the first national park as such in the world. (WPA)
Type (DCMI):JPEG
Topic:Passage to wonderland : rephotographing Joseph Stimson's views of the Cody road to Yellowstone National Park, 1903 & 2008. Amundson, Michael A. Boulder, Colo. : University Press of Colorado, c2013.; Ho! for wonderland : travelers' accounts of Yellowstone, 1872-1914. Whittlesey, Lee H. Albuquerque : University of New Mexico Press, 2009.; Yellowstone National Park. Whittlesey, Lee H. Chicago, Ill. : Arcadia Pub., c2008.
Link:Search Wyoming Places
Document ID:11141035

Links
Digital Library:
© 2018 Wyoming State Library; all rights reserved.
Wyoming State Library