Hot Springs State Park
Metadata
Title:Hot Springs State Park
Other Names:Big Horn Hot Springs State Reserve
History:Colonel James McLaughlin, Indian Inspector, was instructed by the Secretary of the Interior on March 25, 1896, to negotiate the purchase of the Hot Springs on the Big Horn River from the Shoshone and Arapahoe Indians. ... This action was the result of the previous Wyoming Legislature memorializing Congress to purchase the Springs and a tract of land immediately around them: the Springs to be set apart as a public Reservation. ... As a result of the negotiations, on April 23, 1896 a tract of land lying south of the mouth of Owl Creek embracing 55,000 acres was purchased for $60,000. This parcel of land was ten miles long on its east and south sides. The United States Government set aside a reserve of 640 acres, covering the area of the springs, for the benefit of the general public. The Indians were to continue to have the same privileges as previously. Later the reserve was ceded to the State which continues to exercise jurisdiction over it. (Wasden) The Big Horn Hot Springs are about one mile from Thermopolis. The square mile of land on which the springs are situated belongs to the state, and is know as the Wyoming Hot Springs Reserve. The state has recently erected a bathhouse for the free use of the public. On this reserve are many hot springs, the principal one of which is an eighth of a mile east of the Big Horn River and 100 feet above it. This spring measures about 35 feet across and discharges daily 18,500,000 gallons of water at 135 degrees Fahrenheit. (Wyoming State Business Directory, 1910-11) The Hot Springs State Park, first known as the Big Horn Hot Springs State Reserve, is the oldest State Park in Wyoming. (Hot Springs State Park)
County:Hot Springs
Feature Category:Special Features
Origin Of Name:Colonel James McLaughlin, Indian Inspector, was instructed by the Secretary of the Interior on March 25, 1896, to negotiate the purchase of the Hot Springs on the Big Horn River from the Shoshone and Arapahoe Indians. ... This action was the result of the previous Wyoming Legislature memorializing Congress to purchase the Springs and a tract of land immediately around them: the Springs to be set apart as a public Reservation. ... As a result of the negotiations, on April 23, 1896 a tract of land lying south of the mouth of Owl Creek embracing 55,000 acres was purchased for $60,000. This parcel of land was ten miles long on its east and south sides. The United States Government set aside a reserve of 640 acres, covering the area of the springs, for the benefit of the general public. The Indians were to continue to have the same privileges as previously. Later the reserve was ceded to the State which continues to exercise jurisdiction over it. (Wasden) The Big Horn Hot Springs are about one mile from Thermopolis. The square mile of land on which the springs are situated belongs to the state, and is know as the Wyoming Hot Springs Reserve. The state has recently erected a bathhouse for the free use of the public. On this reserve are many hot springs, the principal one of which is an eighth of a mile east of the Big Horn River and 100 feet above it. This spring measures about 35 feet across and discharges daily 18,500,000 gallons of water at 135 degrees Fahrenheit. (Wyoming State Business Directory, 1910-11) The Hot Springs State Park, first known as the Big Horn Hot Springs State Reserve, is the oldest State Park in Wyoming. (Hot Springs State Park)
Type (DCMI):JPEG
Link:Search Wyoming Places
Document ID:11140260

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