Lincoln Highway
Metadata
Title:Lincoln Highway
Other Names:Abraham Lincoln Memorial Highway, U.S. Highway 30
History:US 30, locally known as the Lincoln Highway, crosses the rolling prairies and deserts of southern Wyoming, with heavily timbered, snow-capped mountains in view nearly all the way. Although it reaches its greatest altitude (8,835 feet) near Laramie and crosses the Continental Divide at Creston, it offers easy grades, with little mountain driving. The route connects several of the largest towns in Wyoming, yet has vast stretches where no dwelling is seen for many miles. The first dim lines of the route were traced by the travois poles of Indians, on their way to obtain mountain birch for bows and arrows or to participate in hunting encampments. Fur brigades, with heavily laden carts, made the first wheel tracks, emigrants, with ox-drawn wagons and loose stock, wore these tracks deeper. After an Indian uprising in 1862, the frothing horses and swaying coaches of the Overland stage used this route instead of the Oregon Trail through central Wyoming. Remains of stage stations and military posts are still to be seen along U.S. 30. In the late 1860's, engineers and contractors laid the track of the first transcontinental railroad beside the old trail. An old concrete Lincoln Highway marker (near Green River) recalls the early days of the first transcontinental highway. (Wyoming Guide) At the summit between Cheyenne and Laramie is a sculpture of Abraham Lincoln created by Wyoming artist, Robert Russin. (WSL) "The national Lincoln Memorial Highway Association in 1913 endorsed the southern-Wyoming Overland Trail, along the Union Pacific, as the state's link in the transcontinental Lincoln Highway. Much of this famous highway's route between Rawlins and Rock Springs at first utilized an abandoned Union Pacific grade." (Larson, 1965)
County:Laramie; Albany; Carbon; Sweetwater; Uinta; Lincoln
Feature Category:Manmade Features
Origin Of Name:In 1912 Carl Graham Fisher, president of the Prest-O-Lite carbide headlight manufacturing company and founder of the Indianapolis 500, had first advocated building a road that would let people drive from the Atlantic to the Pacific on a "rock highway": drive without devoting weeks to the journey, drive without choking in clouds of dust or sinking in axle-deep mud. That year the United States Congress had decided to spend $1.7 million to erect the Lincoln Memorial in Washingtona solemn and inspiring piece of symbolism, certainly, but, in Fisher's view, low on practicality. Highway promoters like Fisher and his ally Henry Joy, the Packard Motor Car Company president, insisted there was a more useful way to honor the sixteenth President. Asserted Joy: "Let good roads be built in the name of Lincoln." ("Westward on the old Lincoln Highway" By Philip Langdon in American Heritage 46:2)US 30, locally known as the Lincoln Highway, crosses the rolling prairies and deserts of southern Wyoming, with heavily timbered, snow-capped mountains in view nearly all the way. Although it reaches its greatest altitude (8,835 feet) near Laramie and crosses the Continental Divide at Creston, it offers easy grades, with little mountain driving. The route connects several of the largest towns in Wyoming, yet has vast stretches where no dwelling is seen for many miles. The first dim lines of the route were traced by the travois poles of Indians, on their way to obtain mountain birch for bows and arrows or to participate in hunting encampments. Fur brigades, with heavily laden carts, made the first wheel tracks, emigrants, with ox-drawn wagons and loose stock, wore these tracks deeper. After an Indian uprising in 1862, the frothing horses and swaying coaches of the Overland stage used this route instead of the Oregon Trail through central Wyoming. Remains of stage stations and military posts are still to be seen along U.S. 30. In the late 1860's, engineers and contractors laid the track of the first transcontinental railroad beside the old trail. An old concrete Lincoln Highway marker (near Green River) recalls the early days of the first transcontinental highway. (Wyoming Guide) At the summit between Cheyenne and Laramie is a sculpture of Abraham Lincoln created by Wyoming artist, Robert Russin. (WSL) "The national Lincoln Memorial Highway Association in 1913 endorsed the southern-Wyoming Overland Trail, along the Union Pacific, as the state's link in the transcontinental Lincoln Highway. Much of this famous highway's route between Rawlins and Rock Springs at first utilized an abandoned Union Pacific grade." (Larson, 1965)
Type (DCMI):JPEG
Topic:Hokanson, Drake. The Lincoln Highway: Main Street Across America, University of Iowa Press, 1988.; Weingroff, Richard F. The LIncoln Highway. Federal Highway Administration, Highway History. fhwa.dot.gov.
Link:Search Wyoming Places
Document ID:11140100

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