South Pass City
Metadata
Title:South Pass City
History:South Pass City Post Office was first established in March, 1861 while the area was still part of the Nebraska Territory. It was discontinued in September, 1862 but re-established on March 18, 1868 at which time John H. McGrath was the postmaster. It was discontinued on May 15, 1957. (Wyoming Post Offices) Small town and postoffice in Fremont County, 4 miles southwest from Atlantic City and 40 miles south from Lander. Mining and stockraising the principal industries. (Wyoming State Business Directory, 1910-11) The first gold strike was reported at South Pass in 1842 ... In 1867, a party of miners, returning disappointed from California, prospected the diggings and found rich placer gold. There was a rush, and South Pass City, laid out in October, had a population of 700 before 'cold weather.' Carter County was created, embracing nearly a third of present Wyoming, and South Pass City was made its seat. ... By 1870, South Pass city boasted 4000 inhabitants; its main street was half a mile long, and its school system was rated one of the best in Wyoming. ... By December 1873, the town was deserted, and the county seat was moved to Green River. (Wyoming Guide) As early as 1857, gold had been found in the vicinity by trappers passing through the country, but they had been run out by hostile Indians. In 1866, a small party of discharged soldiers from Fort Bridger, prospecting the area, made their camp on the ground which, a year later, became the site of South Pass City. They discovered a vein of rich gold-bearing ore which they named the Carrissa Mine. They were attacked by hostile Indians and two of the party was killed. They had taken out $15,000 in gold. News of the strike brought a large party of prospectors to the area. (WPA)
County:Fremont
Feature Category:Manmade Features
Origin Of Name:Located near South Pass. (WSL)South Pass City Post Office was first established in March, 1861 while the area was still part of the Nebraska Territory. It was discontinued in September, 1862 but re-established on March 18, 1868 at which time John H. McGrath was the postmaster. It was discontinued on May 15, 1957. (Wyoming Post Offices) Small town and postoffice in Fremont County, 4 miles southwest from Atlantic City and 40 miles south from Lander. Mining and stockraising the principal industries. (Wyoming State Business Directory, 1910-11) The first gold strike was reported at South Pass in 1842 ... In 1867, a party of miners, returning disappointed from California, prospected the diggings and found rich placer gold. There was a rush, and South Pass City, laid out in October, had a population of 700 before 'cold weather.' Carter County was created, embracing nearly a third of present Wyoming, and South Pass City was made its seat. ... By 1870, South Pass city boasted 4000 inhabitantsits main street was half a mile long, and its school system was rated one of the best in Wyoming. ... By December 1873, the town was deserted, and the county seat was moved to Green River. (Wyoming Guide) As early as 1857, gold had been found in the vicinity by trappers passing through the country, but they had been run out by hostile Indians. In 1866, a small party of discharged soldiers from Fort Bridger, prospecting the area, made their camp on the ground which, a year later, became the site of South Pass City. They discovered a vein of rich gold-bearing ore which they named the Carrissa Mine. They were attacked by hostile Indians and two of the party was killed. They had taken out $15,000 in gold. News of the strike brought a large party of prospectors to the area. (WPA)
Type (DCMI):JPEG
Topic:South Pass City State Historic Site Web, 2018.; South. Pass City Fremont County Wyoming PHOTOGRAPHS WRITTEN HISTORICAL AND DESCRIPTIVE DATA REDUCED COPIES OF MEASURED DRAWINGS Historic American Buildings Survey. HABS No. WY0-27.; WyomingHeritage.org & Wyoming State Historic Preservation Office South Pass City WyoHistory.org
Link:Search Wyoming Places
Document ID:11140073

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