Hanna
Metadata
Title:Hanna
History:Hanna Post Office was established on January 11, 1890 with George F. Doane as its postmaster. (Wyoming Post Offices) A coal mining town in Carbon County, 16 miles west from Allen Junction, on the Union Pacific Railroad. large quantities of coal are mined and shipped from this point. Population, 200; altitude, 6,788 feet. (Wyoming State Business Directory, 1901-02) An important coal mining town in Carbon County, on the Union Pacific Railroad. Large quantities of coal are mined and shipped from this point. (Wyoming State Business Directory, 1910-11) "Hanna Mines-Chimney Springs are said to be so called on account of the smoke from a burning coal bank that escaped from a small hill above them when they were first discovered. It has long been known that there was coal in this region. Over a year ago the owners of the carbon mines began to prospect the croppings, and found that while some of the coal was of rather poor quality there was also a number of veins that furnished excellent coal. Intelligent prospecting developed the fact that good coal was there in abundance, and a new series of mines are being opened and a branch track over 20 miles in length being built from the main line at Medicine Bow. The town at these mines will be called Hanna." (Dr. L. D. Eicketts, Territorial geologist, The Wyoming Coal Fields in Department of the Interior Annual Report, 1890) Site of a coal mine disaster on June 30, 1903. (New York Times, July 1, 1903)
County:Carbon
Feature Category:Manmade Features
Origin Of Name:Hanna is one of the important shipping points and trading centers of Carbon County. It is located on the main line of the Union Pacific Railroad forty miles east of Rawlins, has electric lights and waterworks. It was created in 1886 and named after Mark Hanna. He once reported that the coal fields nearby could "supply the nation with coal for a century." (WPA) Named for Mark A. Hanna. (Annals of Wyoming 14:3) "The town was named for Senator Mark Hanna, when he was a member of the Union Pacific Company." (New York Times, July 1, 1903)Hanna Post Office was established on January 11, 1890 with George F. Doane as its postmaster. (Wyoming Post Offices) A coal mining town in Carbon County, 16 miles west from Allen Junction, on the Union Pacific Railroad. large quantities of coal are mined and shipped from this point. Population, 200altitude, 6,788 feet. (Wyoming State Business Directory, 1901-02) An important coal mining town in Carbon County, on the Union Pacific Railroad. Large quantities of coal are mined and shipped from this point. (Wyoming State Business Directory, 1910-11) "Hanna Mines-Chimney Springs are said to be so called on account of the smoke from a burning coal bank that escaped from a small hill above them when they were first discovered. It has long been known that there was coal in this region. Over a year ago the owners of the carbon mines began to prospect the croppings, and found that while some of the coal was of rather poor quality there was also a number of veins that furnished excellent coal. Intelligent prospecting developed the fact that good coal was there in abundance, and a new series of mines are being opened and a branch track over 20 miles in length being built from the main line at Medicine Bow. The town at these mines will be called Hanna." (Dr. L. D. Eicketts, Territorial geologist, The Wyoming Coal Fields in Department of the Interior Annual Report, 1890) Site of a coal mine disaster on June 30, 1903. (New York Times, July 1, 1903)
Type (DCMI):JPEG
Topic:"Disaster at Hanna" Laramie Boomerang July 1, 1903, page 1.; Nancy Anderson. A Brief History of Hanna, Wyoming. Wyohistory.org
Link:Search Wyoming Places
Document ID:11139906

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