Fort Bridger
Metadata
Title:Fort Bridger
Other Names:Camp Scott
History:Bridger's first trading post was built about 1842 as a fur trading and supply post. It was located on Black's Fork south of the present Wall Reservoir. This post was not of great importance to emigrants. The "second" Fort Bridger was built around 1843-44, and with Bridger going into business, it marked the end of the fur trapping era. From this point on it was a major supply point for Oregon, California and Mormon Trail emigrants. (Wyoming Recreation Commission, 1984) Fort Bridger Post Office was established on August 6, 1850 in Nebraska Territory, Carter County. It was discontinued in July, 1851. It was re-established in Dakota Territory in August, 1858. It name was changed to Bridger on July 14, 1906 but changed back to Fort Bridger on July 19, 1911. (Wyoming Post Offices) Fort Bridger Pony Express Station was 12 miles from Millersville Station and 12 miles from Muddy Station. Thomas O. King was a rider here. According to "Saddles and Spurs" by Settle and Settle, he is credited with making the longest ride, which was from Salt Lake to Hams Fork, a distance of 149 miles. (Henderson) "Road runs up the valley of Black's Fork. After 12 miles, Fort Bridger, in N. lat. 41°18'12", and W. long. 110°32'23", on Black's Fork of Green River. Commands Indian trade, fuel, corn; little grass. Post-office, sutler's store, grocery, and other conveniences. Thence rough and rolling ground to Muddy Creek Hill; steep and stony descent. Over a fertile bottom to Big Muddy and Little Muddy Creek, which empties into Black's Fork below Fort Bridger. At Muddy Creek Station there is a Canadian, provisions, excellent milk; no stores" (Burton, "Emigrants Itinerary") Postoffice in Uinta county, 10 miles south of Carter the nearest railroad point, and 36 miles east of Evanston the county seat and 6 miles from Lyman the nearest banking point. Farming and stock raising are the principal industries. Population 175. Altitude 6,700 feet. (Wyoming State Business Directory, 1922)
County:Uinta
Feature Category:Manmade Features
Origin Of Name:Named after Jim Bridger. The first owner of the fort was perhaps the most picturesque figure in early Wyoming. He was often called the "Daniel Boone of the Rockies." Fort Bridger, which he built and Bridger's Pass, which he discovered were named for him. This historical fort has several interesting old buildings still standing; the old pony express barn and the Mormon protective wall are still in existence there, and fitting ceremonies will make this site one of the landmarks for history. (WPA) Named for James Bridger who, with Benito Vasquez, established the fort in 1842. (Annals of Wyoming 14:3) Fort Bridger, Wyoming. Situated near Carter's Station, Union Pacific Railroad, Uinta County; now town of that name. (Heitman) Fort Bridger as a Military Reservation was first called Camp Scott and its name changed to Fort Bridger. (Fort Bridger Military Reservation Senate Report 1120, 61st Congress, 3rd session)Bridger's first trading post was built about 1842 as a fur trading and supply post. It was located on Black's Fork south of the present Wall Reservoir. This post was not of great importance to emigrants. The "second" Fort Bridger was built around 1843-44, and with Bridger going into business, it marked the end of the fur trapping era. From this point on it was a major supply point for Oregon, California and Mormon Trail emigrants. (Wyoming Recreation Commission, 1984) Fort Bridger Post Office was established on August 6, 1850 in Nebraska Territory, Carter County. It was discontinued in July, 1851. It was re-established in Dakota Territory in August, 1858. It name was changed to Bridger on July 14, 1906 but changed back to Fort Bridger on July 19, 1911. (Wyoming Post Offices) Fort Bridger Pony Express Station was 12 miles from Millersville Station and 12 miles from Muddy Station. Thomas O. King was a rider here. According to "Saddles and Spurs" by Settle and Settle, he is credited with making the longest ride, which was from Salt Lake to Hams Fork, a distance of 149 miles. (Henderson) "Road runs up the valley of Black's Fork. After 12 miles, Fort Bridger, in N. lat. 41°18'12", and W. long. 110°32'23", on Black's Fork of Green River. Commands Indian trade, fuel, corn; little grass. Post-office, sutler's store, grocery, and other conveniences. Thence rough and rolling ground to Muddy Creek Hill; steep and stony descent. Over a fertile bottom to Big Muddy and Little Muddy Creek, which empties into Black's Fork below Fort Bridger. At Muddy Creek Station there is a Canadian, provisions, excellent milk; no stores" (Burton, "Emigrants Itinerary") Postoffice in Uinta county, 10 miles south of Carter the nearest railroad point, and 36 miles east of Evanston the county seat and 6 miles from Lyman the nearest banking point. Farming and stock raising are the principal industries. Population 175. Altitude 6,700 feet. (Wyoming State Business Directory, 1922)
Type (DCMI):JPEG
Topic:The school and the town of Fort Bridger. Bartlett, Mary. S.l. : s.n., 1992.; Fort Bridger : the beginning, but not the end. Devish, Deborah. Fort Bridger, WY : Deborah Devish, 2005.; Fort Bridger, Wyoming : a brief history ; comprising Jim Bridger's old trading post, Fort Bridger becomes an army post, Fort Bridger as a frontier army post, Map of the old Oregon Trail (map of principal historic sites and trails of Wyoming) Ellison, Robert Spurrier. Casper, Wyo. : Historical Landmark Commission of Wyoming, 1931.; Fort Bridger : a brief history. Ellison, Robert Spurrier. [Cheyenne, Wyo.] : Wyoming State Archives, Museums, and Historical Dept., 1981.; Fort Bridger, island in the wilderness. Gowans, Fred R. Provo, Utah : Brigham Young University Press, [1975]; Army architecture in the West : Forts Laramie, Bridger, and D.A. Russell, 1849-1912. Hoagland, Alison K. Norman : University of Oklahoma Press, 2004.; Fort Bridger, Wyoming : trading post for Indians, mountain men, and westward migrants. Janin, Hunt. Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland, 2001.; The Cherokee Trail : Bent's Old Fort to Fort Bridger. Whiteley, Lee. Boulder, Colo. : Printed by Johnson Printing, c1999.; Will Bagley. Fort Bridger. WyoHistory.org
Link:Search Wyoming Places
Document ID:11139869

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