Lander
Metadata
Title:Lander
Other Names:Camp Auger, Push Root, Apple City
History:Lander Post Office was established on March 18, 1875 in Sweetwater County prior to the formation of Fremont County. (Wyoming Post Offices) An important incorporated city, the county seat of Fremont County, the present terminus of the Wyoming & Northwestern Railroad, 145 miles west from Casper and 130 miles north of Rawlins. Lander is located on the Popo Agie River, a beautiful stream, just south of the Shoshone Indian reservation, and is surrounded by a stockraising country unequaled in extent and profitableness anywhere. There are also many fine ranches in the neighborhood. Coal and oil are found in abundance, while gold, silver, lead and copper ores have been discovered in the mountains. Stages run from Lander to Fort Washakie, South Pass, etc. The city is well governed and has all the modern requirements, including a $75,000 water and sewerage system. (Wyoming State Business Directory, 1910-11)
County:Fremont
Feature Category:Manmade Features
Origin Of Name:In the winter of 1856, Congress made an appropriation to construct the Fort Kearny, South Pass and Honey Lake Wagon Road, with the object of opening a highway which would permit emigrants to reach the Pacific Coast without having to pass through Salt Lake. William McGraw secured the contract for construction of this road, with the understanding that a military escort would accompany the road builder. Winter quarters were selected on the Popo Agie River at the point two miles northeast of where Lander now stands, and the building of a fort was commenced, which was called Camp McGraw. In the spring of 1859, Colonel F.W. Lander arrived and assumed command of the fort. It was moved to the present site of Lander and named Camp Auger, after General Auger of the United States Army. Later the name was changed to Camp Brown and moved to the present site of Fort Washakie. Ben F. Lowe settled at the site of the present Lander in 1859 and he and Colonel Lander became great friends. Lowe laid out the town site in 1884, together with P. P. Dickinson and Eugene Amoretti, Sr. Lowe suggested the name of his friend Lander as a suitable name for the town, which was agreed to by the residents who were located there. (WPA) Named by B. F. Lowe, founder, for Colonel F. W. Lander who had charge of the military escort in 1858 which accompanied the expedition building the government road from the Missouri River to California. (Annals of Wyoming 14:3) This town was platted many years ago and was named for General F. W. Lander of the United States Army. (Stennett, 1908)Lander Post Office was established on March 18, 1875 in Sweetwater County prior to the formation of Fremont County. (Wyoming Post Offices) An important incorporated city, the county seat of Fremont County, the present terminus of the Wyoming & Northwestern Railroad, 145 miles west from Casper and 130 miles north of Rawlins. Lander is located on the Popo Agie River, a beautiful stream, just south of the Shoshone Indian reservation, and is surrounded by a stockraising country unequaled in extent and profitableness anywhere. There are also many fine ranches in the neighborhood. Coal and oil are found in abundance, while gold, silver, lead and copper ores have been discovered in the mountains. Stages run from Lander to Fort Washakie, South Pass, etc. The city is well governed and has all the modern requirements, including a $75,000 water and sewerage system. (Wyoming State Business Directory, 1910-11)
Type (DCMI):JPEG
Topic:Directory of Lander, Lander Valley and the mines : and other useful information, 1896. Lander, Wyo. : Charles D. Coutant, 1896.; Fremont County and its communities / [by Clarence D. Jayne] [Laramie] : University of Wyoming, 1952.
Link:Search Wyoming Places
Document ID:11139729

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